India Cyberbullying Info, Rights, IT Act 2000 & Important 5 Law Sections

Offences of bullying, stalking, terrorism, breach of confidentiality, etc. committed in cyberspace are like similar offences in the real world and are punishable. The Information Technology Act, 2000 (IT Act) was enacted to deal with e-commerce and electronic records, and also to punish e-commerce offences. Offences such as intimidation, insult, annoying, harassment, defamation, etc. in cyber space continued to be punishable only under the Indian Penal Code (IPC) till the 2008 amendment to the IT Act.

Do U.S. laws go far enough to prevent bullying at school?

Out of the 46 states with anti-bullying laws in place, 36 have provisions that prohibit cyber bullying and 13 have statutes that grant schools the authority to address off-campus behavior that creates a hostile school environment. Copied from Office of Safe and Healthy Students (OSHS ED’s PREVENTION NEWS DIGEST–Vol. 6, No. 55).
The nationwide effort to reduce bullying in U.S. schools can be regarded as part of larger civil and human rights movements that have provided children with many of the rights afforded to adults.

To learn about more key findings and to read the full report, visit: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/opepd/ppss/reports.html#safe.

Bullying Statistics: American Society for the Positive Care of Children

American SPCC Bullying Statistics 160,000 kids per day skips school for fear of being bullied.1 When bystanders intervene, bullying stops within 10 seconds 57% of the time.2 The 3 B’s of Bullying Bullier – 30% of youth admit to bullying Bullied – 1 in 3 students bullied at school Bystander – 70% have witnessed bullying BEEN BULLIED 28% of U.S. students in grades 6–12…

What is Australia doing about Cyberbullying?

What does Cyberbullying look like?
Cyberbullying comes in many forms, but the most common are:

● receiving mean or hurtful text messages from someone you know or even someone you don’t know
● receiving nasty, threatening or hurtful messages through social networking sites such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat
● people sending photos and videos of you to others without your permission to try and embarrass or hurt you
● people spreading rumours or lies about you via emails or social networking sites or text messages
● people trying to stop you from communicating with others or excluding you from chat groups
● people stealing your passwords or logging into your accounts and changing the information there
● people setting up fake profiles pretending to be you, or posting messages or status updates from your accounts.